theraccolta:

From "Know Your Mass" - the well-known classic, a beautiful book of cartoons by Fr. Demetrius Manousos, bearing a 1954 imprimatur by Cardinal Spellman. It was designed for children, but is recommended for all Catholics, especially at a time when authentic catechesis is at an all-time low.

(Reblogged from radioteopoli)

J.R.R. Tolkien in his study with his maps and books.

(Source: naturemetaltolkien)

(Reblogged from musicofthehyperspheres)
from Fr Robert Barron

Do you know St. Julie Billiart? Today we celebrate the feast day of this fascinating nun.

Born in France in 1751, she knew the catechism by heart by age seven. A freak accident paralyzed her from the waist down at age 22, but she never lost hope. Julie received Holy Communion daily and spent four or five hours each day in contemplation. She also welcomed village children to gather around her bed, where she catechized them and offered spiritual advice.

On June 1, 1804, the feast of the Sacred Heart, after 31 years of being paralyzed, Julie prayed a novena and was miraculously healed. She got out of bed, walked out the door, and went on to found a religious order (the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur), establish fifteen convents, and make over one hundred missionary journeys around the world.

St. Julie reminds us today that God uses us wherever we are and despite whatever limitations we bear.

St. Julie Billiart, pray for us!

from Fr Robert Barron

Do you know St. Julie Billiart? Today we celebrate the feast day of this fascinating nun.

Born in France in 1751, she knew the catechism by heart by age seven. A freak accident paralyzed her from the waist down at age 22, but she never lost hope. Julie received Holy Communion daily and spent four or five hours each day in contemplation. She also welcomed village children to gather around her bed, where she catechized them and offered spiritual advice.

On June 1, 1804, the feast of the Sacred Heart, after 31 years of being paralyzed, Julie prayed a novena and was miraculously healed. She got out of bed, walked out the door, and went on to found a religious order (the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur), establish fifteen convents, and make over one hundred missionary journeys around the world.

St. Julie reminds us today that God uses us wherever we are and despite whatever limitations we bear.

St. Julie Billiart, pray for us!

A Dutch Jesuit priest who chose to remain in the beseiged city of Homs to care for its starving population has been shot dead, according to media reports.

Fr Frans van der Lugt, a 75-year-old psychologist, had remained in the rebel-controlled Old City throughout the siege, which is now over 600-days long, with government forces surrounding them. He had been offered the chance to leave, but chose to stay. His death was reported by the pro-government Al-Mayadeen TV, and the Jesuits have since told the Catholic News Service that Fr van der Lugt was beaten and then shot with two bullets in the head. The Washington Post reports that a masked gunman killed the priest inside a monastery in the Bustan al-Diwan area of the city, although the identity and motive of the killer remains unclear.

In February he had told the Daily Telegraph that the city had been abandoned by the international community. He came to Syria in 1966, and in the 1980s had set up an agricultural project outside the city to help young people with mental disabilities. He said that hunger was sending some people insane.
Source: http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/news/

A Dutch Jesuit priest who chose to remain in the beseiged city of Homs to care for its starving population has been shot dead, according to media reports.

Fr Frans van der Lugt, a 75-year-old psychologist, had remained in the rebel-controlled Old City throughout the siege, which is now over 600-days long, with government forces surrounding them. He had been offered the chance to leave, but chose to stay. His death was reported by the pro-government Al-Mayadeen TV, and the Jesuits have since told the Catholic News Service that Fr van der Lugt was beaten and then shot with two bullets in the head. The Washington Post reports that a masked gunman killed the priest inside a monastery in the Bustan al-Diwan area of the city, although the identity and motive of the killer remains unclear.

In February he had told the Daily Telegraph that the city had been abandoned by the international community. He came to Syria in 1966, and in the 1980s had set up an agricultural project outside the city to help young people with mental disabilities. He said that hunger was sending some people insane.
Source: http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/news/

bbsrc:

BEEHAVE

Scientists have created an ingenious computer model that mimics a honey bee colony over the course of several years. The BEEHAVE model was created to investigate the losses of honeybee colonies in recent years and to identify the best course of action for improving honeybee health.

A team of scientists, led by Professor Juliet Osborne from the Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter (and previously at Rothamsted Research), developed BEEHAVE, which simulates the life of a colony including the queen’s egg laying, brood care by nurse bees and foragers collecting nectar and pollen in a realistic landscape.

To build the simulation, the scientists brought together existing honeybee research and data to develop a new model that integrated processes occurring inside and outside the hive. The model allows researchers, beekeepers and anyone interested in bees, to predict colony development and honey production under different environmental conditions and beekeeping practices.  

Find out more at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j5AZhaYEt5U&feature=share&list=UUQDnaJNuMpSOVMVqhDAN-oA

Or try it out at:  www.beehave-model.net.   

BBSRC funds lots of research to help us understand bee health because they are vital for pollinating many food crops.

For more BBSRC bee research visit: http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq17_I-_W

Images from Peter Kennedy at the University of Exeter.

 

(Reblogged from bbsrc)

Queen Elizabeth arrives in the Vatican in her first meeting with Pope Francis offering gifts including honey ‘from her garden’ and Scotch whisky.

The Queen and Pope Francis look on as the Duke of Edinburgh points out a fine bottle of Balmoral whisky. Photograph: Arthur Edwards/The Sun/PA

cyclocosm:

The Pope and his bike. Can’t get a full glimpse of the gruppo, but it does appear to be in line with Francis’ downscaled approach to papal finery. It’s certainly a contrast to the Gold Colnago of John Paul II, though in his defense, Karol Wojtyla was an avid cyclist and outdoorsman before becoming pope. 

(via @cyclingeurope h/t @contador_notebk)

(Reblogged from planetbmx)
(Reblogged from tannerlaroque-deactivated201403)